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Love Story

Preface

A dream of great possibilities. An escape from the searing, rust-laden hotbed that was their country. Such were the thoughts embedded in the minds of Filipinos who yearned to follow the tens of thousands of American servicemen who had boarded cruisers bound for “the States” after the surrender of Japan.

1955. A young Filipino who idolized Americans from the GIs who recaptured his hometown, to Frank Sinatra and his role in the film “Anchors Aweigh” yearned to travel abroad. To some, happiness lay far away from this island country, across an endless ocean of dreams and perceptions, and amid the cherry red Mustangs, movie debuts, and white picket fences of America.

Like thousands of other young “Pinoys” of the time, Ray scrambled from Sangley Point on the island of Luzon to enlist, as a Filipino citizen, in the U.S. Coast Guard. Seven and a half years later, he found himself in an enviable position, a place of privilege where many of the thousands of other Pinoy “swabbees” wished to be, as a steward to the Group Commander of the U. S. Coast Guard Base in New York City.

At the post, Ray was the lowest ranking, but most powerful, enlisted man at the base. With absolute trust, Ray had access to the Captain’s quarters, and, unbeknownst to the commander himself, to his only daughter.

Kim Bullard, some say, was endowed with three remark­able qualities: the charm and grace of royalty; a genuine, universal curiosity unstifled by custom, common, perception nor tradition; and her natural looks, which only served to enhance her gracious manner. The latter hooked Ray. The former allowed him to go willingly.

 

 

Prologue

The captain stared at me with disdain. “Goddamnit  Burdeos! What’s going on here? How the hell did you hay the audacity, the nerve the nerve to pursue my daughter?’

“Captain, sir we’re in love.”

“What?”

“Captain, sir—”

“Burdeos, I want you to end this nonsense now! I mean now! Is that clear?” he said, emphatically, while pounding his desk repeatedly with his fist.

I was shocked and intimidated. I desperately wanted t turn around and walk away, but fortunately, I still had the fortitude to face him. Otherwise, I would’ve spent my time in the brig, and that was not the place where I wanted to be.

He continued to speak. “Burdeos, I can’t believe that has been going on behind my back.”

“Captain, sir—”

He suddenly rose from his seat. I had to stop talking. He walked to other side of the desk, frowned, and then force· fully pounded the desk again.

“I am still puzzled. Even though you knew she’s m~ daughter, you still went ahead and pursued her.”

“Yes, sir I mean —“

“You are arrogant! Simply arrogant!”

“I’m sorry, Captain, sir. I’m just being truthful.”

“You know, Burdeos, many stewards have worked for me before, but I never dreamed of any one of them doing~ such an outrageous act until you came along. Doesn’t that bother you?”

“I couldn’t help it, Captain, sir.”

“That’s a downright poor excuse!”

“I’m truly in love with your daughter, sir.”

It is now on paperback, hardback copy has been sold out by Barnes & Noble. I highly recommend for all ex-navy or current military no matter what branch you are. It is something we can relate. It is true and well written.  This is our story  or daring dream.  For your paper back copy please email Ray Burdeos

RBURDEOS@aol.com  

(Barnes & Noble hard copy edition reviews . Not available right now)

Synopsis
A sincere account of interracial love in New York during the era of Sinatra, Martin & Lewis, and the Velvet Fog. The author's simple approach to characterization yields an honest picture of the public perception of 'mixed couples' at a time when Camelot attempted to re-direct our morals.

 CUSTOMER REVIEWS - An Open Forum
Number of Reviews: 6    Average Rating:

A reviewer, a doctor from manila, February 12, 2001,
the realities of love in a persecuted world
this is the story of a filipino sailor conscripted into the u.s. coast guard during the time when the ultimate dream of filipinos raised in the background of world war II was to find a place in the 'land of milk and honey'. social inequalities in terms of bigotry and citizenship are highlighted in the story from the time this sailor was recruited until he retires from the service. it pictures sweet love lost in exchange for a place in the sun in the baby-booming u.s.a.

A reviewer (edsa1@aol.com), July 30, 1999,
'A 'Filipino' out of water.'
It's not common that you read a story where a beautiful, blonde young ingenue in 1963 New York falls for a leading man who is... pinoy. This is an honest, sincere love story of two people from two different worlds.

A reviewer, a 34 year old instructor in L.A., June 17, 1999,
A sincere account of 'Mixed Couples.'
A sincere account of interracial love in New York during the era of Sinatra, Martin & Lewis, and the Velvet Fog. The author's simple approach to characterization yields an honest picture of the public perception of 'mixed couples' at a time when Camelot attempted to re-direct our morals.

A reviewer, a 34 year old instructor in L.A., June 17, 1999,
A sincere account of 'Mixed Couples.'
A sincere account of interracial love in New York during the era of Sinatra, Martin & Lewis, and the Velvet Fog. The author's simple approach to characterization yields an honest picture of the public perception of 'mixed couples' at a time when Camelot attempted to re-direct our morals.

Alex Alejandro (valejan963@#aol.com), successful US Coast Guard retiree, June 15, 1999,
Excellent reading
The flow of the story is smoothly written and easy to follow. The author did a good job of discribing his true life's experiences while on active duty in the US Coast Guard.